disposable cigarette filters products (such as e-cigarettes, etc.) are not allowed to be sold (except for B2B), etc. It is worth noting that this rule also stipulates that unless the tobacco product is listed before February 15, 2007, all new tobacco products need to undergo PMTA (Pre-marketing Tobacco Product Application) review. Since almost all e-cigarette products are on the market after this date, e-cigarettes are fully included in the PMTA. According to the FDA, the PMTA application is relatively complicated, with more information to be submitted, including ingredients, product design and possible health risks, etc., and it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, in order to strike an appropriate balance between regulation and encouraging the development of innovative tobacco products that may be less dangerous than cigarettes, in July 2017, the FDA announced a comprehensive plan for tobacco and nicotine regulation, extending the ENDS (electronic cigarette) The deadline for submission of PMTA applications is August 8, 2022. According to the previous 2016 new regulations, if no response from the FDA is received during the PMTA submission period, the manufacturer can continue to sell the product on the market. In this way, the e-cigarette company is actually given a respite. 2. The policy buffer period encountered the problem of youth smoking, but this measure has brought unexpected consequences. Although according to the 2016 new regulations, it is not possible to sell e-cigarettes to teenagers under the age of 18, the situation of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers is real. Moreover, because e-cigarettes can still be sold in the market, the smoking rate of e-cigarettes among American teenagers has risen sharply in recent years. According to a set of figures provided by the FDA, this dangerous trend can be seen: e-cigarettes among middle school and high school students in 2018 The number of users is 3.62 million. The use rate of e-cigarettes among high school students increased by 78% (11.7% to 20.8%) between 2017 and 2018, and it increased by 48% (3.3% to 4.9%) among junior high school students. According to a survey from 2013 to 2014, 81% of young e-cigarette users cited attractive taste as the main reason for their use. The problem of smoking among American youths has long attracted the attention of academic circles and policy makers. A 2015 study by the National Academy of Medicine found that among adults who smoke, about 90% started smoking before the age of 19. The study found that raising the minimum legal age to 21 will prevent 223,000 premature deaths. US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Mitch McConnell) said in April this year that he plans to pass legislation to increase the minimum age for buying tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21, in order to curb youth The proliferation of smoking. So far, 12 states, including New Jersey and California, have enacted laws to raise the minimum age to 21. Legislators in New York and Maryland also approved the bill. The FDA originally considered adjusting the nicotine content in cigarettes so that they would not be addictive, so products such as e-cigarettes may provide potential low-risk alternatives for adult smokers. However, if these products attract young people to start using tobacco and nicotine, the feasibility of using these products to reduce the harm of tobacco to humans will be seriously undermined, and it also deviates from the original intention of the FDA's 2017 policy on e-cigarettes "tolerance". Previously, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (who left in April 2019) also repeatedly stated that the 2017 policy will be reviewed. He said that the FDA underestimated the harm of e-cigarettes, because e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which can cause addiction, and smoking e-cigarettes directly increases the probability of smoking traditional cigarettes, which is very detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking. This has also prompted the FDA to take new and powerful measures to resolutely combat and reverse the youth "epidemic". 3. From lenient to strict, the FDA's policy style changes. In order to cope with this unfavorable change and to implement the youth tobacco prevention program, on April 24, 2018, Scott Gottlieb, then the FDA Commissioner, announced enforcement actions to curb the use of JUUL and others by teenagers. e-cigarette. The FDA conducted a large-scale unannounced inspection throughout the country. During the inspections that began in early March 2018, the FDA found 40 violations of illegal sales of JUUL products to teenagers. As the situation of young people smoking e-cigarettes has become more severe, on September 12, 2018, the FDA further announced a series of enforcement actions against the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to children. The FDA requires e-cigarette manufacturers to provide a plan to reduce sales to teenagers within 60 days. Because flavored e-cigarettes are more attractive to teenagers, the FDA also restricts flavored e-cigarettes. On November 15, 2018, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated that the sale of flavored ENDS (electronic cigarettes) to children will be restricted. Mint flavor is excluded, but the attraction of menthol e-cigarette products to young people will be closely controlled, and policies will be adjusted at any time. Despite two large-scale enforcement actions, the trend of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers has not been curbed. On March 4, 2019, the FDA announced new enforcement actions against retailers and manufacturers to combat illegal sales of e-cigarettes to teenagers in physical stores and Internet stores. The FDA also "regrets" for its "tolerance". Former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb first mentioned in September 2018 that the FDA will review the July 2017 Comprehensive Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Regulation to extend the PMTA of e-cigarettes to August 8, 2022. On March 14, 2019, the FDA issued a statement announcing that it would propose to revise the current ENDS (electronic cigarette) compliance policy (July 2017 policy). The revised draft is especially aimed at flavored e-cigarettes, including: some flavored e-cigarette products will no longer sell flavored e-cigarettes. The PMTA deadline for flavored e-cigarettes will be advanced by one year, and flavored cigars will no longer be sold on August 8, 2021. Suggested e-cigarette images Traditional cigarettes cannot be promoted through social media" />

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On June 11, the FDA finalized the "E-cigarette device (ENDS) pre-market application for tobacco products" guidelines. This guidance further clarifies the pre-market application (PMTA) process for e-cigarette and related tobacco product manufacturers. This guide is intended to help people who submit an electronic cigarette (ENDS) pre-marketing application (PMTA) for tobacco products under section 910 of the FD&C Act (21 USC 387j). The guide explains what kind of products, when the PMTA process is required, and the general procedures for pre-marketing tobacco products (ENDS); including what information is required to be submitted in the PMTA under the FD&C (Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic) Act; and The FDA recommends that the products that can be submitted can be beneficial to public health. Although this guide is not binding, it reflects the FDA's attitude and thinking on innovative tobacco products such as e-cigarettes under the current situation. On April 18 this year, US Senate leader McConnell called for raising the legal purchase age to 21 years old. The epidemic of e-cigarettes is extremely detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking, which aroused FDA's policy reflection. In fact, the FDA's regulatory history of the tobacco industry is not long, especially the regulation of e-cigarettes is in the process of exploration. In just over 3 years, it has experienced a sudden change from loose to severe style, regardless of the regulatory style. How to change, the starting point is to reduce the harm of tobacco to people. 1. The main points of the U.S. regulatory policy on e-cigarettes. The "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act" issued by the U.S. government in 2009 granted the FDA the power to supervise tobacco products, but the scope of supervision is only Restricted control of cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, smokeless tobacco and homemade cigarettes. The formal regulation of e-cigarettes in the United States began in May 2016. The FDA officially announced that it will implement a new rule on August 8, 2016 to regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, water pipes and pipe tobacco. Prior to the implementation of this rule, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco or cigars to people under the age of 18. After the implementation of this law, the FDA can legally supervise the manufacturing, import, packaging, labeling, advertising, promotion, sales and distribution of ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems). For example: (1) A manufacturer in the United States needs to register every tobacco production site in the factory with the FDA and report any harmful and potentially harmful substances. (Companies outside the United States do not need to register for the time being, but they must also register in the near future) (2) American manufacturers are required to submit a list of tobacco products to the FDA. (3) ENDS manufacturers are required to submit a list of ingredients for each product to the FDA (Translator's Note: Chinese manufacturers apply this article). (4) Dangerous modifiers, such as light, low, mild, cannot be used to describe tobacco products. (5) Free samples of tobacco products (such as e-cigarettes, etc.) are not allowed to be sold (except for B2B), etc. It is worth noting that this rule also stipulates that unless the tobacco product is listed before February 15, 2007, all new tobacco products need to undergo PMTA (Pre-marketing Tobacco Product Application) review. Since almost all e-cigarette products are on the market after this date, e-cigarettes are fully included in the PMTA. According to the FDA, the PMTA application is relatively complicated, with more information to be submitted, including ingredients, product design and possible health risks, etc., and it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, in order to strike an appropriate balance between regulation and encouraging the development of innovative tobacco products that may be less dangerous than cigarettes, in July 2017, the FDA announced a comprehensive plan for tobacco and nicotine regulation, extending the ENDS (electronic cigarette) The deadline for submission of PMTA applications is August 8, 2022. According to the previous 2016 new regulations, if no response from the FDA is received during the PMTA submission period, the manufacturer can continue to sell the product on the market. In this way, the e-cigarette company is actually given a respite. 2. The policy buffer period encountered the problem of youth smoking, but this measure has brought unexpected consequences. Although according to the 2016 new regulations, it is not possible to sell e-cigarettes to teenagers under the age of 18, the situation of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers is real. Moreover, because e-cigarettes can still be sold in the market, the smoking rate of e-cigarettes among American teenagers has risen sharply in recent years. According to a set of figures provided by the FDA, this dangerous trend can be seen: e-cigarettes among middle school and high school students in 2018 The number of users is 3.62 million. The use rate of e-cigarettes among high school students increased by 78% (11.7% to 20.8%) between 2017 and 2018, and it increased by 48% (3.3% to 4.9%) among junior high school students. According to a survey from 2013 to 2014, 81% of young e-cigarette users cited attractive taste as the main reason for their use. The problem of smoking among American youths has long attracted the attention of academic circles and policy makers. A 2015 study by the National Academy of Medicine found that among adults who smoke, about 90% started smoking before the age of 19. The study found that raising the minimum legal age to 21 will prevent 223,000 premature deaths. US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Mitch McConnell) said in April this year that he plans to pass legislation to increase the minimum age for buying tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21, in order to curb youth The proliferation of smoking. So far, 12 states, including New Jersey and California, have enacted laws to raise the minimum age to 21. Legislators in New York and Maryland also approved the bill. The FDA originally considered adjusting the nicotine content in cigarettes so that they would not be addictive, so products such as e-cigarettes may provide potential low-risk alternatives for adult smokers. However, if these products attract young people to start using tobacco and nicotine, the feasibility of using these products to reduce the harm of tobacco to humans will be seriously undermined, and it also deviates from the original intention of the FDA's 2017 policy on e-cigarettes "tolerance". Previously, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (who left in April 2019) also repeatedly stated that the 2017 policy will be reviewed. He said that the FDA underestimated the harm of e-cigarettes, because e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which can cause addiction, and smoking e-cigarettes directly increases the probability of smoking traditional cigarettes, which is very detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking. This has also prompted the FDA to take new and powerful measures to resolutely combat and reverse the youth "epidemic". 3. From lenient to strict, the FDA's policy style changes. In order to cope with this unfavorable change and to implement the youth tobacco prevention program, on April 24, 2018, Scott Gottlieb, then the FDA Commissioner, announced enforcement actions to curb the use of JUUL and others by teenagers. e-cigarette. The FDA conducted a large-scale unannounced inspection throughout the country. During the inspections that began in early March 2018, the FDA found 40 violations of illegal sales of JUUL products to teenagers. As the situation of young people smoking e-cigarettes has become more severe, on September 12, 2018, the FDA further announced a series of enforcement actions against the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to children. The FDA requires e-cigarette manufacturers to provide a plan to reduce sales to teenagers within 60 days. Because flavored e-cigarettes are more attractive to teenagers, the FDA also restricts flavored e-cigarettes. On November 15, 2018, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated that the sale of flavored ENDS (electronic cigarettes) to children will be restricted. Mint flavor is excluded, but the attraction of menthol e-cigarette products to young people will be closely controlled, and policies will be adjusted at any time. Despite two large-scale enforcement actions, the trend of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers has not been curbed. On March 4, 2019, the FDA announced new enforcement actions against retailers and manufacturers to combat illegal sales of e-cigarettes to teenagers in physical stores and Internet stores. The FDA also "regrets" for its "tolerance". Former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb first mentioned in September 2018 that the FDA will review the July 2017 Comprehensive Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Regulation to extend the PMTA of e-cigarettes to August 8, 2022. On March 14, 2019, the FDA issued a statement announcing that it would propose to revise the current ENDS (electronic cigarette) compliance policy (July 2017 policy). The revised draft is especially aimed at flavored e-cigarettes, including: some flavored e-cigarette products will no longer sell flavored e-cigarettes. The PMTA deadline for flavored e-cigarettes will be advanced by one year, and flavored cigars will no longer be sold on August 8, 2021. Suggested e-cigarette images Traditional cigarettes cannot be promoted through social mediaOn June 11, the FDA finalized the "E-cigarette device (ENDS) pre-market application for tobacco products" guidelines. This guidance further clarifies the pre-market application (PMTA) process for e-cigarette and related tobacco product manufacturers. This guide is intended to help people who submit an electronic cigarette (ENDS) pre-marketing application (PMTA) for tobacco products under section 910 of the FD&C Act (21 USC 387j). The guide explains what kind of products, when the PMTA process is required, and the general procedures for pre-marketing tobacco products (ENDS); including what information is required to be submitted in the PMTA under the FD&C (Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic) Act; and The FDA recommends that the products that can be submitted can be beneficial to public health. Although this guide is not binding, it reflects the FDA's attitude and thinking on innovative tobacco products such as e-cigarettes under the current situation. On April 18 this year, US Senate leader McConnell called for raising the legal purchase age to 21 years old. The epidemic of e-cigarettes is extremely detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking, which aroused FDA's policy reflection. In fact, the FDA's regulatory history of the tobacco industry is not long, especially the regulation of e-cigarettes is in the process of exploration. In just over 3 years, it has experienced a sudden change from loose to severe style, regardless of the regulatory style. How to change, the starting point is to reduce the harm of tobacco to people. 1. The main points of the U.S. regulatory policy on e-cigarettes. The "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act" issued by the U.S. government in 2009 granted the FDA the power to supervise tobacco products, but the scope of supervision is only Restricted control of cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, smokeless tobacco and homemade cigarettes. The formal regulation of e-cigarettes in the United States began in May 2016. The FDA officially announced that it will implement a new rule on August 8, 2016 to regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, water pipes and pipe tobacco. Prior to the implementation of this rule, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco or cigars to people under the age of 18. After the implementation of this law, the FDA can legally supervise the manufacturing, import, packaging, labeling, advertising, promotion, sales and distribution of ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems). For example: (1) A manufacturer in the United States needs to register every tobacco production site in the factory with the FDA and report any harmful and potentially harmful substances. (Companies outside the United States do not need to register for the time being, but they must also register in the near future) (2) American manufacturers are required to submit a list of tobacco products to the FDA. (3) ENDS manufacturers are required to submit a list of ingredients for each product to the FDA (Translator's Note: Chinese manufacturers apply this article). (4) Dangerous modifiers, such as light, low, mild, cannot be used to describe tobacco products. (5) Free samples of tobacco products (such as e-cigarettes, etc.) are not allowed to be sold (except for B2B), etc. It is worth noting that this rule also stipulates that unless the tobacco product is listed before February 15, 2007, all new tobacco products need to undergo PMTA (Pre-marketing Tobacco Product Application) review. Since almost all e-cigarette products are on the market after this date, e-cigarettes are fully included in the PMTA. According to the FDA, the PMTA application is relatively complicated, with more information to be submitted, including ingredients, product design and possible health risks, etc., and it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, in order to strike an appropriate balance between regulation and encouraging the development of innovative tobacco products that may be less dangerous than cigarettes, in July 2017, the FDA announced a comprehensive plan for tobacco and nicotine regulation, extending the ENDS (electronic cigarette) The deadline for submission of PMTA applications is August 8, 2022. According to the previous 2016 new regulations, if no response from the FDA is received during the PMTA submission period, the manufacturer can continue to sell the product on the market. In this way, the e-cigarette company is actually given a respite. 2. The policy buffer period encountered the problem of youth smoking, but this measure has brought unexpected consequences. Although according to the 2016 new regulations, it is not possible to sell e-cigarettes to teenagers under the age of 18, the situation of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers is real. Moreover, because e-cigarettes can still be sold in the market, the smoking rate of e-cigarettes among American teenagers has risen sharply in recent years. According to a set of figures provided by the FDA, this dangerous trend can be seen: e-cigarettes among middle school and high school students in 2018 The number of users is 3.62 million. The use rate of e-cigarettes among high school students increased by 78% (11.7% to 20.8%) between 2017 and 2018, and it increased by 48% (3.3% to 4.9%) among junior high school students. According to a survey from 2013 to 2014, 81% of young e-cigarette users cited attractive taste as the main reason for their use. The problem of smoking among American youths has long attracted the attention of academic circles and policy makers. A 2015 study by the National Academy of Medicine found that among adults who smoke, about 90% started smoking before the age of 19. The study found that raising the minimum legal age to 21 will prevent 223,000 premature deaths. US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Mitch McConnell) said in April this year that he plans to pass legislation to increase the minimum age for buying tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21, in order to curb youth The proliferation of smoking. So far, 12 states, including New Jersey and California, have enacted laws to raise the minimum age to 21. Legislators in New York and Maryland also approved the bill. The FDA originally considered adjusting the nicotine content in cigarettes so that they would not be addictive, so products such as e-cigarettes may provide potential low-risk alternatives for adult smokers. However, if these products attract young people to start using tobacco and nicotine, the feasibility of using these products to reduce the harm of tobacco to humans will be seriously undermined, and it also deviates from the original intention of the FDA's 2017 policy on e-cigarettes "tolerance". Previously, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (who left in April 2019) also repeatedly stated that the 2017 policy will be reviewed. He said that the FDA underestimated the harm of e-cigarettes, because e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which can cause addiction, and smoking e-cigarettes directly increases the probability of smoking traditional cigarettes, which is very detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking. This has also prompted the FDA to take new and powerful measures to resolutely combat and reverse the youth "epidemic". 3. From lenient to strict, the FDA's policy style changes. In order to cope with this unfavorable change and to implement the youth tobacco prevention program, on April 24, 2018, Scott Gottlieb, then the FDA Commissioner, announced enforcement actions to curb the use of JUUL and others by teenagers. e-cigarette. The FDA conducted a large-scale unannounced inspection throughout the country. During the inspections that began in early March 2018, the FDA found 40 violations of illegal sales of JUUL products to teenagers. As the situation of young people smoking e-cigarettes has become more severe, on September 12, 2018, the FDA further announced a series of enforcement actions against the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to children. The FDA requires e-cigarette manufacturers to provide a plan to reduce sales to teenagers within 60 days. Because flavored e-cigarettes are more attractive to teenagers, the FDA also restricts flavored e-cigarettes. On November 15, 2018, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated that the sale of flavored ENDS (electronic cigarettes) to children will be restricted. Mint flavor is excluded, but the attraction of menthol e-cigarette products to young people will be closely controlled, and policies will be adjusted at any time. Despite two large-scale enforcement actions, the trend of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers has not been curbed. On March 4, 2019, the FDA announced new enforcement actions against retailers and manufacturers to combat illegal sales of e-cigarettes to teenagers in physical stores and Internet stores. The FDA also "regrets" for its "tolerance". Former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb first mentioned in September 2018 that the FDA will review the July 2017 Comprehensive Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Regulation to extend the PMTA of e-cigarettes to August 8, 2022. On March 14, 2019, the FDA issued a statement announcing that it would propose to revise the current ENDS (electronic cigarette) compliance policy (July 2017 policy). The revised draft is especially aimed at flavored e-cigarettes, including: some flavored e-cigarette products will no longer sell flavored e-cigarettes. The PMTA deadline for flavored e-cigarettes will be advanced by one year, and flavored cigars will no longer be sold on August 8, 2021. Suggested e-cigarette images Traditional cigarettes cannot be promoted through social media

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FDA releases e-cigarette listing guidelines, an article sorting out U.S. e-cigarette regulatory policies

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On June 11, the FDA finalized the "E-cigarette device (ENDS) pre-market application for tobacco products" guidelines. This guidance further clarifies the pre-market application (PMTA) process for e-cigarette and related tobacco product manufacturers. This guide is intended to help people who submit an electronic cigarette (ENDS) pre-marketing application (PMTA) for tobacco products under section 910 of the FD&C Act (21 USC 387j). The guide explains what kind of products, when the PMTA process is required, and the general procedures for pre-marketing tobacco products (ENDS); including what information is required to be submitted in the PMTA under the FD&C (Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic) Act; and The FDA recommends that the products that can be submitted can be beneficial to public health. Although this guide is not binding, it reflects the FDA's attitude and thinking on innovative tobacco products such as e-cigarettes under the current situation. On April 18 this year, US Senate leader McConnell called for raising the legal purchase age to 21 years old. The epidemic of e-cigarettes is extremely detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking, which aroused FDA's policy reflection. In fact, the FDA's regulatory history of the tobacco industry is not long, especially the regulation of e-cigarettes is in the process of exploration. In just over 3 years, it has experienced a sudden change from loose to severe style, regardless of the regulatory style. How to change, the starting point is to reduce the harm of tobacco to people. 1. The main points of the U.S. regulatory policy on e-cigarettes. The "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act" issued by the U.S. government in 2009 granted the FDA the power to supervise tobacco products, but the scope of supervision is only Restricted control of cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, smokeless tobacco and homemade cigarettes. The formal regulation of e-cigarettes in the United States began in May 2016. The FDA officially announced that it will implement a new rule on August 8, 2016 to regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, water pipes and pipe tobacco. Prior to the implementation of this rule, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco or cigars to people under the age of 18. After the implementation of this law, the FDA can legally supervise the manufacturing, import, packaging, labeling, advertising, promotion, sales and distribution of ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems). For example: (1) A manufacturer in the United States needs to register every tobacco production site in the factory with the FDA and report any harmful and potentially harmful substances. (Companies outside the United States do not need to register for the time being, but they must also register in the near future) (2) American manufacturers are required to submit a list of tobacco products to the FDA. (3) ENDS manufacturers are required to submit a list of ingredients for each product to the FDA (Translator's Note: Chinese manufacturers apply this article). (4) Dangerous modifiers, such as light, low, mild, cannot be used to describe tobacco products. (5) Free samples of tobacco products (such as e-cigarettes, etc.) are not allowed to be sold (except for B2B), etc. It is worth noting that this rule also stipulates that unless the tobacco product is listed before February 15, 2007, all new tobacco products need to undergo PMTA (Pre-marketing Tobacco Product Application) review. Since almost all e-cigarette products are on the market after this date, e-cigarettes are fully included in the PMTA. According to the FDA, the PMTA application is relatively complicated, with more information to be submitted, including ingredients, product design and possible health risks, etc., and it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, in order to strike an appropriate balance between regulation and encouraging the development of innovative tobacco products that may be less dangerous than cigarettes, in July 2017, the FDA announced a comprehensive plan for tobacco and nicotine regulation, extending the ENDS (electronic cigarette) The deadline for submission of PMTA applications is August 8, 2022. According to the previous 2016 new regulations, if no response from the FDA is received during the PMTA submission period, the manufacturer can continue to sell the product on the market. In this way, the e-cigarette company is actually given a respite. 2. The policy buffer period encountered the problem of youth smoking, but this measure has brought unexpected consequences. Although according to the 2016 new regulations, it is not possible to sell e-cigarettes to teenagers under the age of 18, the situation of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers is real. Moreover, because e-cigarettes can still be sold in the market, the smoking rate of e-cigarettes among American teenagers has risen sharply in recent years. According to a set of figures provided by the FDA, this dangerous trend can be seen: e-cigarettes among middle school and high school students in 2018 The number of users is 3.62 million. The use rate of e-cigarettes among high school students increased by 78% (11.7% to 20.8%) between 2017 and 2018, and it increased by 48% (3.3% to 4.9%) among junior high school students. According to a survey from 2013 to 2014, 81% of young e-cigarette users cited attractive taste as the main reason for their use. The problem of smoking among American youths has long attracted the attention of academic circles and policy makers. A 2015 study by the National Academy of Medicine found that among adults who smoke, about 90% started smoking before the age of 19. The study found that raising the minimum legal age to 21 will prevent 223,000 premature deaths. US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Mitch McConnell) said in April this year that he plans to pass legislation to increase the minimum age for buying tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21, in order to curb youth The proliferation of smoking. So far, 12 states, including New Jersey and California, have enacted laws to raise the minimum age to 21. Legislators in New York and Maryland also approved the bill. The FDA originally considered adjusting the nicotine content in cigarettes so that they would not be addictive, so products such as e-cigarettes may provide potential low-risk alternatives for adult smokers. However, if these products attract young people to start using tobacco and nicotine, the feasibility of using these products to reduce the harm of tobacco to humans will be seriously undermined, and it also deviates from the original intention of the FDA's 2017 policy on e-cigarettes "tolerance". Previously, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (who left in April 2019) also repeatedly stated that the 2017 policy will be reviewed. He said that the FDA underestimated the harm of e-cigarettes, because e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which can cause addiction, and smoking e-cigarettes directly increases the probability of smoking traditional cigarettes, which is very detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking. This has also prompted the FDA to take new and powerful measures to resolutely combat and reverse the youth "epidemic". 3. From lenient to strict, the FDA's policy style changes. In order to cope with this unfavorable change and to implement the youth tobacco prevention program, on April 24, 2018, Scott Gottlieb, then the FDA Commissioner, announced enforcement actions to curb the use of JUUL and others by teenagers. e-cigarette. The FDA conducted a large-scale unannounced inspection throughout the country. During the inspections that began in early March 2018, the FDA found 40 violations of illegal sales of JUUL products to teenagers. As the situation of young people smoking e-cigarettes has become more severe, on September 12, 2018, the FDA further announced a series of enforcement actions against the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to children. The FDA requires e-cigarette manufacturers to provide a plan to reduce sales to teenagers within 60 days. Because flavored e-cigarettes are more attractive to teenagers, the FDA also restricts flavored e-cigarettes. On November 15, 2018, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated that the sale of flavored ENDS (electronic cigarettes) to children will be restricted. Mint flavor is excluded, but the attraction of menthol e-cigarette products to young people will be closely controlled, and policies will be adjusted at any time. Despite two large-scale enforcement actions, the trend of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers has not been curbed. On March 4, 2019, the FDA announced new enforcement actions against retailers and manufacturers to combat illegal sales of e-cigarettes to teenagers in physical stores and Internet stores. The FDA also "regrets" for its "tolerance". Former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb first mentioned in September 2018 that the FDA will review the July 2017 Comprehensive Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Regulation to extend the PMTA of e-cigarettes to August 8, 2022. On March 14, 2019, the FDA issued a statement announcing that it would propose to revise the current ENDS (electronic cigarette) compliance policy (July 2017 policy). The revised draft is especially aimed at flavored e-cigarettes, including: some flavored e-cigarette products will no longer sell flavored e-cigarettes. The PMTA deadline for flavored e-cigarettes will be advanced by one year, and flavored cigars will no longer be sold on August 8, 2021. Suggested e-cigarette images Traditional cigarettes cannot be promoted through social media

On June 11, the FDA finalized the "E-cigarette device (ENDS) pre-market application for tobacco products" guidelines. This guidance further clarifies the pre-market application (PMTA) process for e-cigarette and related tobacco product manufacturers. This guide is intended to help people who submit an electronic cigarette (ENDS) pre-marketing application (PMTA) for tobacco products under section 910 of the FD&C Act (21 USC 387j). The guide explains what kind of products, when the PMTA process is required, and the general procedures for pre-marketing tobacco products (ENDS); including what information is required to be submitted in the PMTA under the FD&C (Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic) Act; and The FDA recommends that the products that can be submitted can be beneficial to public health. Although this guide is not binding, it reflects the FDA's attitude and thinking on innovative tobacco products such as e-cigarettes under the current situation. On April 18 this year, US Senate leader McConnell called for raising the legal purchase age to 21 years old. The epidemic of e-cigarettes is extremely detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking, which aroused FDA's policy reflection. In fact, the FDA's regulatory history of the tobacco industry is not long, especially the regulation of e-cigarettes is in the process of exploration. In just over 3 years, it has experienced a sudden change from loose to severe style, regardless of the regulatory style. How to change, the starting point is to reduce the harm of tobacco to people. 1. The main points of the U.S. regulatory policy on e-cigarettes. The "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act" issued by the U.S. government in 2009 granted the FDA the power to supervise tobacco products, but the scope of supervision is only Restricted control of cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, smokeless tobacco and homemade cigarettes. The formal regulation of e-cigarettes in the United States began in May 2016. The FDA officially announced that it will implement a new rule on August 8, 2016 to regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, water pipes and pipe tobacco. Prior to the implementation of this rule, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco or cigars to people under the age of 18. After the implementation of this law, the FDA can legally supervise the manufacturing, import, packaging, labeling, advertising, promotion, sales and distribution of ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems). For example: (1) A manufacturer in the United States needs to register every tobacco production site in the factory with the FDA and report any harmful and potentially harmful substances. (Companies outside the United States do not need to register for the time being, but they must also register in the near future) (2) American manufacturers are required to submit a list of tobacco products to the FDA. (3) ENDS manufacturers are required to submit a list of ingredients for each product to the FDA (Translator's Note: Chinese manufacturers apply this article). (4) Dangerous modifiers, such as light, low, mild, cannot be used to describe tobacco products. (5) Free samples of tobacco products (such as e-cigarettes, etc.) are not allowed to be sold (except for B2B), etc. It is worth noting that this rule also stipulates that unless the tobacco product is listed before February 15, 2007, all new tobacco products need to undergo PMTA (Pre-marketing Tobacco Product Application) review. Since almost all e-cigarette products are on the market after this date, e-cigarettes are fully included in the PMTA. According to the FDA, the PMTA application is relatively complicated, with more information to be submitted, including ingredients, product design and possible health risks, etc., and it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, in order to strike an appropriate balance between regulation and encouraging the development of innovative tobacco products that may be less dangerous than cigarettes, in July 2017, the FDA announced a comprehensive plan for tobacco and nicotine regulation, extending the ENDS (electronic cigarette) The deadline for submission of PMTA applications is August 8, 2022. According to the previous 2016 new regulations, if no response from the FDA is received during the PMTA submission period, the manufacturer can continue to sell the product on the market. In this way, the e-cigarette company is actually given a respite. 2. The policy buffer period encountered the problem of youth smoking, but this measure has brought unexpected consequences. Although according to the 2016 new regulations, it is not possible to sell e-cigarettes to teenagers under the age of 18, the situation of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers is real. Moreover, because e-cigarettes can still be sold in the market, the smoking rate of e-cigarettes among American teenagers has risen sharply in recent years. According to a set of figures provided by the FDA, this dangerous trend can be seen: e-cigarettes among middle school and high school students in 2018 The number of users is 3.62 million. The use rate of e-cigarettes among high school students increased by 78% (11.7% to 20.8%) between 2017 and 2018, and it increased by 48% (3.3% to 4.9%) among junior high school students. According to a survey from 2013 to 2014, 81% of young e-cigarette users cited attractive taste as the main reason for their use. The problem of smoking among American youths has long attracted the attention of academic circles and policy makers. A 2015 study by the National Academy of Medicine found that among adults who smoke, about 90% started smoking before the age of 19. The study found that raising the minimum legal age to 21 will prevent 223,000 premature deaths. US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Mitch McConnell) said in April this year that he plans to pass legislation to increase the minimum age for buying tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21, in order to curb youth The proliferation of smoking. So far, 12 states, including New Jersey and California, have enacted laws to raise the minimum age to 21. Legislators in New York and Maryland also approved the bill. The FDA originally considered adjusting the nicotine content in cigarettes so that they would not be addictive, so products such as e-cigarettes may provide potential low-risk alternatives for adult smokers. However, if these products attract young people to start using tobacco and nicotine, the feasibility of using these products to reduce the harm of tobacco to humans will be seriously undermined, and it also deviates from the original intention of the FDA's 2017 policy on e-cigarettes "tolerance". Previously, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (who left in April 2019) also repeatedly stated that the 2017 policy will be reviewed. He said that the FDA underestimated the harm of e-cigarettes, because e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which can cause addiction, and smoking e-cigarettes directly increases the probability of smoking traditional cigarettes, which is very detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking. This has also prompted the FDA to take new and powerful measures to resolutely combat and reverse the youth "epidemic". 3. From lenient to strict, the FDA's policy style changes. In order to cope with this unfavorable change and to implement the youth tobacco prevention program, on April 24, 2018, Scott Gottlieb, then the FDA Commissioner, announced enforcement actions to curb the use of JUUL and others by teenagers. e-cigarette. The FDA conducted a large-scale unannounced inspection throughout the country. During the inspections that began in early March 2018, the FDA found 40 violations of illegal sales of JUUL products to teenagers. As the situation of young people smoking e-cigarettes has become more severe, on September 12, 2018, the FDA further announced a series of enforcement actions against the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to children. The FDA requires e-cigarette manufacturers to provide a plan to reduce sales to teenagers within 60 days. Because flavored e-cigarettes are more attractive to teenagers, the FDA also restricts flavored e-cigarettes. On November 15, 2018, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated that the sale of flavored ENDS (electronic cigarettes) to children will be restricted. Mint flavor is excluded, but the attraction of menthol e-cigarette products to young people will be closely controlled, and policies will be adjusted at any time. Despite two large-scale enforcement actions, the trend of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers has not been curbed. On March 4, 2019, the FDA announced new enforcement actions against retailers and manufacturers to combat illegal sales of e-cigarettes to teenagers in physical stores and Internet stores. The FDA also "regrets" for its "tolerance". Former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb first mentioned in September 2018 that the FDA will review the July 2017 Comprehensive Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Regulation to extend the PMTA of e-cigarettes to August 8, 2022. On March 14, 2019, the FDA issued a statement announcing that it would propose to revise the current ENDS (electronic cigarette) compliance policy (July 2017 policy). The revised draft is especially aimed at flavored e-cigarettes, including: some flavored e-cigarette products will no longer sell flavored e-cigarettes. The PMTA deadline for flavored e-cigarettes will be advanced by one year, and flavored cigars will no longer be sold on August 8, 2021. Suggested e-cigarette images Traditional cigarettes cannot be promoted through social media

On June 11, the FDA finalized the "E-cigarette device (ENDS) pre-market application for tobacco products" guidelines. This guidance further clarifies the pre-market application (PMTA) process for e-cigarette and related tobacco product manufacturers. This guide is intended to help people who submit an electronic cigarette (ENDS) pre-marketing application (PMTA) for tobacco products under section 910 of the FD&C Act (21 USC 387j). The guide explains what kind of products, when the PMTA process is required, and the general procedures for pre-marketing tobacco products (ENDS); including what information is required to be submitted in the PMTA under the FD&C (Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic) Act; and The FDA recommends that the products that can be submitted can be beneficial to public health. Although this guide is not binding, it reflects the FDA's attitude and thinking on innovative tobacco products such as e-cigarettes under the current situation. On April 18 this year, US Senate leader McConnell called for raising the legal purchase age to 21 years old. The epidemic of e-cigarettes is extremely detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking, which aroused FDA's policy reflection. In fact, the FDA's regulatory history of the tobacco industry is not long, especially the regulation of e-cigarettes is in the process of exploration. In just over 3 years, it has experienced a sudden change from loose to severe style, regardless of the regulatory style. How to change, the starting point is to reduce the harm of tobacco to people. 1. The main points of the U.S. regulatory policy on e-cigarettes. The "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act" issued by the U.S. government in 2009 granted the FDA the power to supervise tobacco products, but the scope of supervision is only Restricted control of cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, smokeless tobacco and homemade cigarettes. The formal regulation of e-cigarettes in the United States began in May 2016. The FDA officially announced that it will implement a new rule on August 8, 2016 to regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, water pipes and pipe tobacco. Prior to the implementation of this rule, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco or cigars to people under the age of 18. After the implementation of this law, the FDA can legally supervise the manufacturing, import, packaging, labeling, advertising, promotion, sales and distribution of ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems). For example: (1) A manufacturer in the United States needs to register every tobacco production site in the factory with the FDA and report any harmful and potentially harmful substances. (Companies outside the United States do not need to register for the time being, but they must also register in the near future) (2) American manufacturers are required to submit a list of tobacco products to the FDA. (3) ENDS manufacturers are required to submit a list of ingredients for each product to the FDA (Translator's Note: Chinese manufacturers apply this article). (4) Dangerous modifiers, such as light, low, mild, cannot be used to describe tobacco products. (5) Free samples of tobacco products (such as e-cigarettes, etc.) are not allowed to be sold (except for B2B), etc. It is worth noting that this rule also stipulates that unless the tobacco product is listed before February 15, 2007, all new tobacco products need to undergo PMTA (Pre-marketing Tobacco Product Application) review. Since almost all e-cigarette products are on the market after this date, e-cigarettes are fully included in the PMTA. According to the FDA, the PMTA application is relatively complicated, with more information to be submitted, including ingredients, product design and possible health risks, etc., and it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, in order to strike an appropriate balance between regulation and encouraging the development of innovative tobacco products that may be less dangerous than cigarettes, in July 2017, the FDA announced a comprehensive plan for tobacco and nicotine regulation, extending the ENDS (electronic cigarette) The deadline for submission of PMTA applications is August 8, 2022. According to the previous 2016 new regulations, if no response from the FDA is received during the PMTA submission period, the manufacturer can continue to sell the product on the market. In this way, the e-cigarette company is actually given a respite. 2. The policy buffer period encountered the problem of youth smoking, but this measure has brought unexpected consequences. Although according to the 2016 new regulations, it is not possible to sell e-cigarettes to teenagers under the age of 18, the situation of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers is real. Moreover, because e-cigarettes can still be sold in the market, the smoking rate of e-cigarettes among American teenagers has risen sharply in recent years. According to a set of figures provided by the FDA, this dangerous trend can be seen: e-cigarettes among middle school and high school students in 2018 The number of users is 3.62 million. The use rate of e-cigarettes among high school students increased by 78% (11.7% to 20.8%) between 2017 and 2018, and it increased by 48% (3.3% to 4.9%) among junior high school students. According to a survey from 2013 to 2014, 81% of young e-cigarette users cited attractive taste as the main reason for their use. The problem of smoking among American youths has long attracted the attention of academic circles and policy makers. A 2015 study by the National Academy of Medicine found that among adults who smoke, about 90% started smoking before the age of 19. The study found that raising the minimum legal age to 21 will prevent 223,000 premature deaths. US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Mitch McConnell) said in April this year that he plans to pass legislation to increase the minimum age for buying tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21, in order to curb youth The proliferation of smoking. So far, 12 states, including New Jersey and California, have enacted laws to raise the minimum age to 21. Legislators in New York and Maryland also approved the bill. The FDA originally considered adjusting the nicotine content in cigarettes so that they would not be addictive, so products such as e-cigarettes may provide potential low-risk alternatives for adult smokers. However, if these products attract young people to start using tobacco and nicotine, the feasibility of using these products to reduce the harm of tobacco to humans will be seriously undermined, and it also deviates from the original intention of the FDA's 2017 policy on e-cigarettes "tolerance". Previously, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (who left in April 2019) also repeatedly stated that the 2017 policy will be reviewed. He said that the FDA underestimated the harm of e-cigarettes, because e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which can cause addiction, and smoking e-cigarettes directly increases the probability of smoking traditional cigarettes, which is very detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking. This has also prompted the FDA to take new and powerful measures to resolutely combat and reverse the youth "epidemic". 3. From lenient to strict, the FDA's policy style changes. In order to cope with this unfavorable change and to implement the youth tobacco prevention program, on April 24, 2018, Scott Gottlieb, then the FDA Commissioner, announced enforcement actions to curb the use of JUUL and others by teenagers. e-cigarette. The FDA conducted a large-scale unannounced inspection throughout the country. During the inspections that began in early March 2018, the FDA found 40 violations of illegal sales of JUUL products to teenagers. As the situation of young people smoking e-cigarettes has become more severe, on September 12, 2018, the FDA further announced a series of enforcement actions against the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to children. The FDA requires e-cigarette manufacturers to provide a plan to reduce sales to teenagers within 60 days. Because flavored e-cigarettes are more attractive to teenagers, the FDA also restricts flavored e-cigarettes. On November 15, 2018, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated that the sale of flavored ENDS (electronic cigarettes) to children will be restricted. Mint flavor is excluded, but the attraction of menthol e-cigarette products to young people will be closely controlled, and policies will be adjusted at any time. Despite two large-scale enforcement actions, the trend of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers has not been curbed. On March 4, 2019, the FDA announced new enforcement actions against retailers and manufacturers to combat illegal sales of e-cigarettes to teenagers in physical stores and Internet stores. The FDA also "regrets" for its "tolerance". Former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb first mentioned in September 2018 that the FDA will review the July 2017 Comprehensive Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Regulation to extend the PMTA of e-cigarettes to August 8, 2022. On March 14, 2019, the FDA issued a statement announcing that it would propose to revise the current ENDS (electronic cigarette) compliance policy (July 2017 policy). The revised draft is especially aimed at flavored e-cigarettes, including: some flavored e-cigarette products will no longer sell flavored e-cigarettes. The PMTA deadline for flavored e-cigarettes will be advanced by one year, and flavored cigars will no longer be sold on August 8, 2021. Suggested e-cigarette images Traditional cigarettes cannot be promoted through social media

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FDA releases e-cigarette listing guidelines, an article sorting out U.S. e-cigarette regulatory policies

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On June 11, the FDA finalized the "E-cigarette device (ENDS) pre-market application for tobacco products" guidelines. This guidance further clarifies the pre-market application (PMTA) process for e-cigarette and related tobacco product manufacturers. This guide is intended to help people who submit an electronic cigarette (ENDS) pre-marketing application (PMTA) for tobacco products under section 910 of the FD&C Act (21 USC 387j). The guide explains what kind of products, when the PMTA process is required, and the general procedures for pre-marketing tobacco products (ENDS); including what information is required to be submitted in the PMTA under the FD&C (Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic) Act; and The FDA recommends that the products that can be submitted can be beneficial to public health. Although this guide is not binding, it reflects the FDA's attitude and thinking on innovative tobacco products such as e-cigarettes under the current situation. On April 18 this year, US Senate leader McConnell called for raising the legal purchase age to 21 years old. The epidemic of e-cigarettes is extremely detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking, which aroused FDA's policy reflection. In fact, the FDA's regulatory history of the tobacco industry is not long, especially the regulation of e-cigarettes is in the process of exploration. In just over 3 years, it has experienced a sudden change from loose to severe style, regardless of the regulatory style. How to change, the starting point is to reduce the harm of tobacco to people. 1. The main points of the U.S. regulatory policy on e-cigarettes. The "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act" issued by the U.S. government in 2009 granted the FDA the power to supervise tobacco products, but the scope of supervision is only Restricted control of cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, smokeless tobacco and homemade cigarettes. The formal regulation of e-cigarettes in the United States began in May 2016. The FDA officially announced that it will implement a new rule on August 8, 2016 to regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, water pipes and pipe tobacco. Prior to the implementation of this rule, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco or cigars to people under the age of 18. After the implementation of this law, the FDA can legally supervise the manufacturing, import, packaging, labeling, advertising, promotion, sales and distribution of ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems). For example: (1) A manufacturer in the United States needs to register every tobacco production site in the factory with the FDA and report any harmful and potentially harmful substances. (Companies outside the United States do not need to register for the time being, but they must also register in the near future) (2) American manufacturers are required to submit a list of tobacco products to the FDA. (3) ENDS manufacturers are required to submit a list of ingredients for each product to the FDA (Translator's Note: Chinese manufacturers apply this article). (4) Dangerous modifiers, such as light, low, mild, cannot be used to describe tobacco products. (5) Free samples of tobacco products (such as e-cigarettes, etc.) are not allowed to be sold (except for B2B), etc. It is worth noting that this rule also stipulates that unless the tobacco product is listed before February 15, 2007, all new tobacco products need to undergo PMTA (Pre-marketing Tobacco Product Application) review. Since almost all e-cigarette products are on the market after this date, e-cigarettes are fully included in the PMTA. According to the FDA, the PMTA application is relatively complicated, with more information to be submitted, including ingredients, product design and possible health risks, etc., and it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, in order to strike an appropriate balance between regulation and encouraging the development of innovative tobacco products that may be less dangerous than cigarettes, in July 2017, the FDA announced a comprehensive plan for tobacco and nicotine regulation, extending the ENDS (electronic cigarette) The deadline for submission of PMTA applications is August 8, 2022. According to the previous 2016 new regulations, if no response from the FDA is received during the PMTA submission period, the manufacturer can continue to sell the product on the market. In this way, the e-cigarette company is actually given a respite. 2. The policy buffer period encountered the problem of youth smoking, but this measure has brought unexpected consequences. Although according to the 2016 new regulations, it is not possible to sell e-cigarettes to teenagers under the age of 18, the situation of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers is real. Moreover, because e-cigarettes can still be sold in the market, the smoking rate of e-cigarettes among American teenagers has risen sharply in recent years. According to a set of figures provided by the FDA, this dangerous trend can be seen: e-cigarettes among middle school and high school students in 2018 The number of users is 3.62 million. The use rate of e-cigarettes among high school students increased by 78% (11.7% to 20.8%) between 2017 and 2018, and it increased by 48% (3.3% to 4.9%) among junior high school students. According to a survey from 2013 to 2014, 81% of young e-cigarette users cited attractive taste as the main reason for their use. The problem of smoking among American youths has long attracted the attention of academic circles and policy makers. A 2015 study by the National Academy of Medicine found that among adults who smoke, about 90% started smoking before the age of 19. The study found that raising the minimum legal age to 21 will prevent 223,000 premature deaths. US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Mitch McConnell) said in April this year that he plans to pass legislation to increase the minimum age for buying tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, from 18 to 21, in order to curb youth The proliferation of smoking. So far, 12 states, including New Jersey and California, have enacted laws to raise the minimum age to 21. Legislators in New York and Maryland also approved the bill. The FDA originally considered adjusting the nicotine content in cigarettes so that they would not be addictive, so products such as e-cigarettes may provide potential low-risk alternatives for adult smokers. However, if these products attract young people to start using tobacco and nicotine, the feasibility of using these products to reduce the harm of tobacco to humans will be seriously undermined, and it also deviates from the original intention of the FDA's 2017 policy on e-cigarettes "tolerance". Previously, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (who left in April 2019) also repeatedly stated that the 2017 policy will be reviewed. He said that the FDA underestimated the harm of e-cigarettes, because e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which can cause addiction, and smoking e-cigarettes directly increases the probability of smoking traditional cigarettes, which is very detrimental to the prevention and control of youth smoking. This has also prompted the FDA to take new and powerful measures to resolutely combat and reverse the youth "epidemic". 3. From lenient to strict, the FDA's policy style changes. In order to cope with this unfavorable change and to implement the youth tobacco prevention program, on April 24, 2018, Scott Gottlieb, then the FDA Commissioner, announced enforcement actions to curb the use of JUUL and others by teenagers. e-cigarette. The FDA conducted a large-scale unannounced inspection throughout the country. During the inspections that began in early March 2018, the FDA found 40 violations of illegal sales of JUUL products to teenagers. As the situation of young people smoking e-cigarettes has become more severe, on September 12, 2018, the FDA further announced a series of enforcement actions against the sale and marketing of e-cigarettes to children. The FDA requires e-cigarette manufacturers to provide a plan to reduce sales to teenagers within 60 days. Because flavored e-cigarettes are more attractive to teenagers, the FDA also restricts flavored e-cigarettes. On November 15, 2018, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated that the sale of flavored ENDS (electronic cigarettes) to children will be restricted. Mint flavor is excluded, but the attraction of menthol e-cigarette products to young people will be closely controlled, and policies will be adjusted at any time. Despite two large-scale enforcement actions, the trend of selling e-cigarettes to teenagers has not been curbed. On March 4, 2019, the FDA announced new enforcement actions against retailers and manufacturers to combat illegal sales of e-cigarettes to teenagers in physical stores and Internet stores. The FDA also "regrets" for its "tolerance". Former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb first mentioned in September 2018 that the FDA will review the July 2017 Comprehensive Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Regulation to extend the PMTA of e-cigarettes to August 8, 2022. On March 14, 2019, the FDA issued a statement announcing that it would propose to revise the current ENDS (electronic cigarette) compliance policy (July 2017 policy). The revised draft is especially aimed at flavored e-cigarettes, including: some flavored e-cigarette products will no longer sell flavored e-cigarettes. The PMTA deadline for flavored e-cigarettes will be advanced by one year, and flavored cigars will no longer be sold on August 8, 2021. Suggested e-cigarette images Traditional cigarettes cannot be promoted through social media

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